1.  
RB  JAX
Rush Att
118
Rush Yds
500
Rush TD
3
Rush Avg
4.2
Rec
29
Rec Yds
208
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
7.2
It initially appeared Robinson, an undrafted rookie out of FCS Illinois State, was likely to start his pro career on the Jacksonville practice squad. Instead, he's listed atop the depth chart at running back after the team waived Leonard Fournette at the end of August. The Jaguars widely have been expected to utilize a backfield committee, but it could be just Robinson and passing-down specialist Chris Thompson getting work at the start of the season, considering Devine Ozigbo is dealing with a hamstring injury and will miss at least a few weeks after being placed on IR.
2.  
RB  IND
Rush Att
265
Rush Yds
1241
Rush TD
9
Rush Avg
4.7
Rec
34
Rec Yds
277
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
8.1
The latest in a long line of Wisconsin RBs with impressive college resumes, Taylor was the second player in FBS history to post consecutive 2,000-yard rushing seasons (after Iowa State's Troy Davis) and the second to win consecutive Doak Walker awards (after Darren McFadden). Taylor is a premier physical specimen, running a 4.39 40 at the combine at a rock-solid 226 pounds. That combination of size and speed allows him to bowl over defenders while also providing a home-run threat. Taylor even showed improvement as a receiver in 2019, and his balance and power through contact make him more than just a scheme-dependent weapon. His hands are a concern, however, both in terms of fumbles - 18 on 968 touches at Wisconsin - and drops. Taylor's mammoth college workload could also impact his shelf life in the NFL, and like many Badger RBs, the patience he developed behind a dominant offensive line won't always serve him well in the NFL. Fortunately, he landed with an Indianapolis squad that has a strong argument for best O-line in the league. The downside of Taylor's new home is that he'll have tough competition for both carries and targets, with Marlon Mack in the mix for the former and Nyheim Hines likely accounting for a good portion of the latter. Taylor should eventually get a big workload, but it isn't clear if that will happen Week 1, midseason or in 2021.
3.  
WR  MIN
Rec
62
Rec Yds
764
Rec TD
5
Rec Avg
12.3
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
The Vikings traded Stefon Diggs to the Bills for the 22nd pick and used it to select Jefferson, his replacement. Jefferson was a monster at LSU last year with 1,540 yards and 18 touchdowns on 111 catches. At 6-1, 202, Jefferson has above average size and good speed (4.43), and his vertical (37.5 inches) and broad jumps (126 inches) were both in the top quartile among his peers. While Jefferson might be ideally suited for the slot - where he dominated at LSU - he'll likely have to play out wide more in Minnesota's two-TE offense. Even in three-wide formations, it could be Adam Thielen rather than Jefferson getting the majority of slot snaps. Either way, the rookie should begin the year as the Vikings' No. 2 target behind Thielen, providing some much-needed downfield playmaking for Kirk Cousins.
4.  
WR  CIN
Rec
50
Rec Yds
690
Rec TD
4
Rec Avg
13.8
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Taken with the 33rd overall pick in this year's draft, Higgins lands in a crowded Bengals receiving group. Aging star A.J. Green was franchised for 2020, Tyler Boyd is a good bet for well more than 100 targets and 2017 first-round burner John Ross and mammoth Auden Tate both had significant roles last year. At 6-3, 216, Higgins is built like Green, though his pro day timed speeds ranged from a 4.43 40 (Greenlike) to a sluggish 4.59. Either way, Higgins was a playmaker in college, with 25 TDs the last two years at Clemson on only 185 targets. He dominates when the ball is in the air, using his height, catch radius and good hands to outreach smaller defenders. His route running needs work, but he'll have Green as a mentor, and there's a good chance he surpasses Ross and Tate as the No. 3 option before long.
5.  
RB  DET
Rush Att
197
Rush Yds
851
Rush TD
5
Rush Avg
4.3
Rec
35
Rec Yds
284
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
8.1
Georgia's recent track record of producing quality NFL runnings backs is outstanding, and Swift seems ready to be the next Bulldog to follow in the footsteps of Todd Gurley, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel. Despite his name, Swift's calling card is not elite speed, though he ran a 4.48 in the 40-yard dash at the combine. He mostly relies on a dynamic blend of vision, footwork and football IQ that makes it difficult for the initial defender to bring him down, or even the second or third would-be tackler. Swift seemingly understands how to get the most out of his blockers, and he adds good receiving skills. Like many rookie running backs, he needs to improve his pass protection, and a lack of pile-moving power could deny him short-yardage opportunities, but he nonetheless offers three-down potential long term. It's less clear that he'll actually have that opportunity this season, coming in as the 35th overall pick to a Detroit backfield that already has 2018 second-rounder Kerryon Johnson. The Lions even added another running back in the fifth round - 193-pound Jason Huntley - to compete with Ty Johnson and Bo Scarbrough at the bottom of their depth chart, and the team additionally saw fit to bring in Adrian Peterson just prior to Week 1. Swift looks like the closet thing the team has to a complete package in the backfield, but he'll likely be part of a two- or three-man committee at least to begin the season.
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