1.  
RB  NYG
Rush Att
278
Rush Yds
1285
Rush TD
11
Rush Avg
4.6
Rec
74
Rec Yds
675
Rec TD
3
Rec Avg
9.1
A September ankle injury cost Barkley any chance of repeating his phenomenal rookie numbers, but when he was fully healthy he proved that his 2018 production was no fluke. Arguably the greatest big-play threat in the league, Barkley averaged 5.2 yards a carry in the six games following the Giants' bye to close out the season, and despite only being in top shape for about half the year he still recorded five gains of at least 40 yards while finishing eighth in rushing yards after contact (605). At 5-11, 233, Barkley's unreal blend of power, speed, elusiveness and receiving skill is basically unparalleled, but he's needed every ounce of that talent working behind an offensive line that was awful in 2018, and merely below average last season. With No. 4 overall pick Andrew Thomas boosting the O-line and QB Daniel Jones potentially improving, Barkley might finally have a supporting cast worthy of his talent. New OC Jason Garrett knows how to feed a bell cow from his days in Dallas - Ezekiel Elliott has averaged nearly three more touches per game than Barkley in their respective careers - so volume should not be an issue. Don't be surprised if Saquon's rookie production ends up being his baseline rather than his ceiling.
2.  
Rush Att
252
Rush Yds
1177
Rush TD
10
Rush Avg
4.7
Rec
96
Rec Yds
833
Rec TD
3
Rec Avg
8.7
McCaffrey had a season for the ages in 2019, posting the third-most scrimmage yards in league history (2,392) and falling only 118 shy of the NFL record. With Cam Newton out most of the year, CMac became the unquestioned focal point of the Panthers' attack, racking up a dizzying 403 touches and topping 100 receptions for the second consecutive campaign. He wasn't just an open-field weapon, though. McCaffrey saw 20 carries inside the 5-yard line, good for second in the NFL, and that goal-line usage led to a career-high 15 rushing TDs. The question heading into 2020 is how much that workload will affect his efficiency. McCaffrey's elite elusiveness and speed have allowed him to avoid a lot of big hits, and he has yet to miss a game in his career, but the history of running backs coming off massive workloads is checkered at best. Even within the context of last year he showed a possible weakness, as he managed just 1.8 YPC after contact, ninth fewest among qualified rushers and a drop from the 2.1 he posted in 2018. That said, Carolina's new-look offense with Teddy Bridgewater under center and former Saints assistant Joe Brady as coordinator should be just as committed to getting McCaffrey the ball in optimal situations, and the front office didn't make him the highest-paid running back in the NFL without expecting plenty of production in return.
3.  
RB  DAL
Rush Att
286
Rush Yds
1269
Rush TD
12
Rush Avg
4.4
Rec
57
Rec Yds
412
Rec TD
2
Rec Avg
7.2
Elliott played 16 games for the first time last season, a remarkable achievement considering he sat out all preseason in a contract dispute. Once he had a new six-year extension in his pocket, Zeke resumed his role as the focal point of the Dallas offense and barely missed a beat, finding the end zone in six of the first seven games en route to 1,777 scrimmage yards and 14 TDs. Elliott simply does everything well, but it's his ability to handle a huge workload that might be his most impressive attribute. He led the league in red-zone rushes (61) and tied Aaron Jones in TDs from inside the 5 with 10, and only Derrick Henry saw more than Elliott's 301 total carries - the third time in four seasons Elliott has topped 300. The Cowboys head into 2020 facing some significant changes, however. Gone is long-time coach Jason Garrett, and while OC Kellen Moore remains, new head coach Mike McCarthy is likely to favor a more pass-friendly scheme. Perhaps more important, five-time Pro Bowler Travis Frederick retired, leaving Joe Looney as the starting center. Elliott posted strong numbers in 2018 when Frederick missed the entire season, but the combination of uncertainty in front of him and a potential loss of some touches to backup Tony Pollard could prevent Zeke from producing at an elite level again.
4.  
RB  TEN
Rush Att
298
Rush Yds
1378
Rush TD
14
Rush Avg
4.6
Rec
27
Rec Yds
222
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
8.2
Henry's eruption at the end of 2018 proved to be merely a prelude to a thunderous 2019. He edged Nick Chubb for the rushing crown thanks both to a league-high 303 carries and 5.1 YPC, while also tying Aaron Jones for the league lead with 16 rushing touchdowns. At a beastly 6-3, 247, Henry is nearly impossible to bring down once he gets a head of steam - he tied for third in the NFL with 29 broken tackles (emphasis on the "broken") while ranking second with an average of 3.2 yards after contact. The Titans remain reluctant to use him much in the passing game, putting a ceiling on his overall fantasy production, but he continues to show some ability as a receiver, and there may be no more terrifying situation for a cornerback than seeing Henry get the ball in the flat and realizing you're all that stands between him and the end zone. Quarterback Ryan Tannehill thrived with the play-action opportunities Henry helped to create, and it is unlikely offensive coordinator Arthur Smith will add too many wrinkles to a formula that worked so brilliantly in the second half of last season. Henry even signed a long-term contract in July, removing the possibility of a holdout. Given his low workload prior to 2019, he should still have a few more seasons of peak output in the tank despite his punishing running style.
5.  
RB  CLE
Rush Att
290
Rush Yds
1346
Rush TD
11
Rush Avg
4.6
Rec
39
Rec Yds
310
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
7.9
Chubb delivered on the promise of his rookie season, falling just short of a rushing crown last year while demonstrating he can be a capable three-down option in a Browns offense that otherwise fell well short of expectations. He showed impressive power and balance through contact, tying Aaron Jones with a league-high 32 broken tackles on rush attempts, though it was Chubb's speed that really opened eyes. On an 88-yard touchdown run in Week 4, Chubb hit a top speed of 21.95 mph, the fourth-fastest time recorded by a ball carrier in 2019 - the gear he lost when he suffered his devastating knee injury in college apparently has returned. All told, Chubb was fourth in the league with an average of 3.0 yards after contact. Despite his outstanding numbers, with Kareem Hunt still in the fold and around for a full season, it's possible Chubb doesn't match the touch volume he got last year. He averaged 19.3 carries and 22.4 touches in the first eight games of the season, but only 15.2 rushes and 16.4 touches in the final five weeks once Hunt was comfortable in the offense. Workload is the only real concern for Chubb, however, and if the Cleveland attack around him improves, he could see more scoring opportunities to make up for any lost volume.
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